One of the most talked about Supreme Court cases in American history started right here in North Texas and the original courtroom is now just a living area.

I can already hear the angry comments coming in about this story. Not trying to start an abortion debate this morning, just something I had no idea about until today. When we think of Supreme Court cases in American history, Roe V. Wade is one of the most argued of all time. Since 1970, until today, it is still talked about.

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It all started when Sarah Weddington and Linda Coffee represented pregnant Norma McCorvey on whether abortion should be legal or not.The defendant in the case was Dallas County District Attorney Henry Wade, who represented the State of Texas. A lot of people always ask, who is Roe? It was a legal pseudonym, the lawsuit was filed under Jane Roe.

The case first started at the Dallas Courthouse over 50 years ago. Nowadays, the building is used primarily as a post office and an apartment building. The original courtroom is now used as a common area for the third floor residents of the North Evay Apartments.

The area is now know as the Magistrate Lounge. If you look at the photos above, you can clearly see how this used to be a courtroom. The big glass or stone structure is where a judge would sit. Apparently the apartment rents it out for weddings or big events. I wonder if anybody knew this case happened here before their wedding?

Decided to look up the rent, 1 bedroom and 1 bathroom is $1,803 a month and that's the cheapest option. I knew Roe V. Wade started in Dallas, but I had no idea this place is now just a quiet room for apartment dwellers to hang out in.

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