Former Kiss guitarist Vinnie Vincent said that his upcoming memoir will contain “the in-depth answers to everything” he had experienced, and admitted it would be an “uncomfortable” read.

Vincent, who played with Kiss from 1982-84, has spent most of the past two decades out of the spotlight, only recently returning to public attention.

“I've been away 20 years, not by choosing, but because of events that happened," he told Talking Metal (via Blabbermouth). "So those events will be really talked about in uncomfortable depth — because it's cathartic, number one. Number two, the fans deserve to know; and I deserve to tell it. And it's nice to be back, but you can only be back unless … The meaning of being back, the reason and the meaningfulness of being back can only depend on the resolve of the past … that book is my resolve.”

He noted that the book, which is being co-written with an unidentified author, would be “a very interesting read and something that will be not a one-time picking it up and never reading it again” experience.

“If I have my way – which I will – it will be something that I wanna read a few times," he said. "Even though whatever happened to me happened, I wanna make sure that it's compelling enough where I get to pick it up and not put it down for a while. And if I can do that ... "

Vincent compared it to a record. “If I could listen to my own recordings, which a lot of times is difficult, but if I can listen to my own recordings and actually enjoy them, then I know I've done something that is satisfying to me," he said. "So I want the book to be that way. And there's a lot to tell.”

Meanwhile, his former Kiss bandmate Gene Simmons commented once again on speculation surrounding the band’s bid to trademark “The End of the Road,” leading to speculation that a farewell tour is being considered. “We can’t keep doing this forever,” he told the Chicago Sun-Times. “We are the hardest-working band in show business. If [Mick] Jagger stepped into my dragon boots, he couldn’t last a half hour.”

He added that the band “doesn’t want to stay onstage a day longer than when we feel valid. … Remember, we introduced ourselves as ‘When you wanted the best, you got the best, the hottest band in the world.’ Not we ‘used to be the best.'”